Initial Aphasia Treatments More Cost-Effective Than Later Ones Initial aphasia treatment sessions result in relatively larger and more cost-effective benefits than later aphasia treatment sessions, according to preliminary results published Feb. 26 in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. But the authors caution that these results have limitations, and recommend prospective studies to examine the cost-effectiveness of speech-language ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   May 01, 2014
Initial Aphasia Treatments More Cost-Effective Than Later Ones
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Language Disorders / Aphasia / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   May 01, 2014
Initial Aphasia Treatments More Cost-Effective Than Later Ones
The ASHA Leader, May 2014, Vol. 19, 13. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.19052014.13
The ASHA Leader, May 2014, Vol. 19, 13. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.19052014.13
Initial aphasia treatment sessions result in relatively larger and more cost-effective benefits than later aphasia treatment sessions, according to preliminary results published Feb. 26 in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. But the authors caution that these results have limitations, and recommend prospective studies to examine the cost-effectiveness of speech-language treatment for people with aphasia.
Researchers—led by Charles Ellis of the Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston—completed a retrospective cost-effectiveness analysis using experimental data from 19 published aphasia treatment studies. Based on participants’ pre- and post-treatment proficiency scores, the average cost-effectiveness ratio for all sessions was $9.54 for each 1 percent increase in the outcome of interest. Measures of incremental cost-effectiveness indicated that aphasia treatments resulted in statistically significant improvements through 17 treatment sessions. Increases in proficiency occurred at a cost of approximately $7 per 1 percent increase for the first three sessions to more than $20 in the 14th session.
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May 2014
Volume 19, Issue 5