May 2014 Michael Rolnick, director of speech and language pathology at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Mich., was selected by Crain’s Detroit Business magazine as the 2014 Health Care Hero Award winner in the allied health category. Rolnick founded Beaumont’s speech and language program in 1968, and expanded it to ... People
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May 2014
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Professional Issues & Training / ASHA News & Member Stories / People
People   |   May 01, 2014
May 2014
The ASHA Leader, May 2014, Vol. 19, 18-19. doi:10.1044/leader.PPL.19052014.18
The ASHA Leader, May 2014, Vol. 19, 18-19. doi:10.1044/leader.PPL.19052014.18
Awarded
Michael Rolnick, director of speech and language pathology at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Mich., was selected by Crain’s Detroit Business magazine as the 2014 Health Care Hero Award winner in the allied health category. Rolnick founded Beaumont’s speech and language program in 1968, and expanded it to a regional referral center for communication disorders with more than 80 clinicians serving about 2,000 adults and children annually … Jean Neils-Strunjas, Armstrong Atlantic State University professor and speech-language pathologist, received the John (Jack) C. Bess Memorial Award for service to the Georgia Speech-Language-Hearing Association in February. The annual award is presented in honor of researcher and clinical audiologist John C. Bess to honor like-minded individuals.
In the news
Li-Rong Lilly Cheng, an SLP and director of the Chinese Studies Institute at San Diego State University, was named one of the 25 most influential women in San Diego’s history—for her impact on cross-cultural communication—in an ABC 10 News story (Mar. 8) … John Costello, an SLP at Boston Children’s Hospital, and Roberta Kelley, a neuro-clinical specialist in speech pathology at the Virginia Mason Neuroscience Institute in Seattle, were quoted in an NPR.org story (Feb. 25) about voice banking for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Kelley works with ALS patients to store words and short phrases for when they can no longer speak, and Costello is credited with inventing the clinical use of voice banking … Two audiologists were interviewed for stories about infant “sleep machines” and their potential to damage children’s hearing. Patti Martin, director of audiology and speech pathology at Arkansas Children’s Hospital, Little Rock, was quoted in an MSN Healthy Living story (Mar. 3) and a CNN.com story (Mar. 3)—she urged parents to exercise caution when using these popular devices. Linda Hazard, director of the Vermont Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, was quoted in a USA Today article (Mar. 3), in which she recommended that parents use such machines judiciously and educate themselves on the devices’ performance.
Named
Mary Spremulli, an SLP in Punta Gorda, Fla., has been appointed to the Education Committee of the World Parkinson’s Program, and will contribute articles related to communication and swallowing for the progam’s online newsletter, which is distributed to a global audience of more than 15,000 readers. The World Parkinson’s Program provides educational brochures in more than 12 languages, as well as health care supplies to people with Parkinson’s who are unable to purchase them.
Published
Diane P. Zimmerman, retired superintendent of schools and former SLP, recently co-authored two books: “Lemons to Lemonade: Resolving Problems in Meetings, Workshops, and PLCs” focuses on adult communication and how leaders can run more effective meetings; “Cognitive Capital: Investing in Teacher Quality,” just released by Teachers College Press, urges leaders to invest in building and sharing talented teachers.
Deaths
Michael Scott Drummond, 39, on Feb. 11, 2014, in Ellijay, Ga. Drummond completed his undergraduate studies at the University of Florida, and in 1998 earned his master’s degree at Valdosta (Georgia) State University. He worked as an SLP at Aegis-Golden Living Center in Charlotte, N.C. Drummond is survived by his wife Marlie, daughters Baleigh and Morgan, father Almond C. Drummond, and siblings Kevin and Julie.
Deborah Guthermann, 60, on March 4, 2014, in Newton, Mass. Guthermann graduated from New York University with a bachelor’s degree in 1974, and went on to earn her master’s from Northwestern University, and then a doctorate in audiology. She was co-owner of the West Newton Hearing Center for 28 years. Guthermann is survived by her husband of 37 years, Howard E. Guthermann, and her children Rachel and Joshua.
Frances Lee Johnson, 91, on Nov. 8, 2013, at the Champaign Urbana Regional Rehab Center in Savoy, Ill. Johnson graduated from Augustana College in Rock Island, Ill., majoring in speech, English and physical education. She then joined the U.S. Navy WAVES for two and a half years, and while in Washington, D.C., spent some of her time guarding Eleanor Roosevelt. After her World War II military duty, she taught high school speech and English for four years before earning her master’s degree from the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign. Johnson taught at the University of Illinois in the Department of Speech and Hearing Science for 32 years, retiring as an associate professor emeritus. A Life Member of ASHA, she is survived by her brother, Ben.
Molly Penson Krival, 88, on Feb. 15, 2014, in Fort Myers, Fla. Krival enrolled in the University of Missouri–Columbia, where she met Arthur Krival, whom she later married. In 1949, Krival earned her master’s degree in speech correction and began her career as an SLP. After moving to Wisconsin in 1960, Krival was invited to enroll in the doctoral program in speech pathology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. In 1967, a professional opportunity took the couple to Nairobi, Kenya, where Krival volunteered at a speech therapy clinic and gave invited lectures in neuroscience at Nairobi Hospital. In Kenya, she learned to provide speech and language services across multiple cultures and in several languages. After returning to the United States in 1970, Krival accepted a faculty position in communication disorders at the University of Wisconsin–Whitewater, where she specialized in adult neurological speech and language disorders and coordinated the graduate program. She was president of the Wisconsin Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology Association, and was active in developing professional standards for SLPs throughout the 1970s and 1980s. She retired as a full professor emeritus in 1988. Krival is survived by her brother, Edward Penson, and her children David, Michael, Stephen and Catherine.
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May 2014
Volume 19, Issue 5