Research in Brief: Employment Improves ASD Symptoms More independent work environments may lead to reductions in autism spectrum disorder symptoms and improve daily living in adults with ASD, according to a study in the November issue of the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Researchers—led by Julie Lounds Taylor of Vanderbilt Kennedy Center—examined 153 adults with ASD ... Research in Brief
Free
Research in Brief  |   April 01, 2014
Research in Brief: Employment Improves ASD Symptoms
Author Notes
Article Information
Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   April 01, 2014
Research in Brief: Employment Improves ASD Symptoms
The ASHA Leader, April 2014, Vol. 19, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB6.19042014.np
The ASHA Leader, April 2014, Vol. 19, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB6.19042014.np
More independent work environments may lead to reductions in autism spectrum disorder symptoms and improve daily living in adults with ASD, according to a study in the November issue of the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.
Researchers—led by Julie Lounds Taylor of Vanderbilt Kennedy Center—examined 153 adults with ASD (average age 30) and found that greater vocational independence and engagement were associated with improvements in core features of ASD, other problem behaviors and the ability to take care of oneself.
The participants were part of a larger longitudinal study on adolescents and adults with ASD. The authors collected data at two intervals separated by five and a half years. They found that each person’s degree of independence in vocational activities was uniquely related to subsequent changes in ASD symptoms—such as restricted interests, repetitive behaviors, communication impairments and difficulties with social interactions—as well as other problem behaviors and activities of daily living.
The results suggest that employment may be therapeutic in the development of adults with ASD. Similar to typically developing adults, vocational activities may serve to provide cognitive and social stimulation for people with ASD, and enhance well-being and quality of life.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
April 2014
Volume 19, Issue 4