Research in Brief: Brains With ASD Create More Information at Rest The brains of children with autism spectrum disorders generate more information at rest—on average, 42 percent more—according to a paper published Dec. 24 in Frontiers in Neuroinformatics. The study offers a scientific explanation for ASD’s most typical characteristic: withdrawal into one’s own inner world. This excess information production may help ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   April 01, 2014
Research in Brief: Brains With ASD Create More Information at Rest
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Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   April 01, 2014
Research in Brief: Brains With ASD Create More Information at Rest
The ASHA Leader, April 2014, Vol. 19, 18. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.19042014.17
The ASHA Leader, April 2014, Vol. 19, 18. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.19042014.17
The brains of children with autism spectrum disorders generate more information at rest—on average, 42 percent more—according to a paper published Dec. 24 in Frontiers in Neuroinformatics. The study offers a scientific explanation for ASD’s most typical characteristic: withdrawal into one’s own inner world. This excess information production may help explain a child’s detachment from the environment.
“Our results suggest that autistic children are not interested in social interactions because their brains generate more information at rest, which we interpret as more introspection in line with early descriptions of the disorder,” said Roberto Fernández Galán, senior author and associate professor of neurosciences at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine.
The authors quantified information and applied it to brain activity recorded with magnetoencephalography. They collected and analyzed MEG data from nine boys with ASD (ages 7–16) and 10 age-matched, typically developing children (six males and four females, ages 6–14). The brains of participants with ASD generated an average of 42 percent more information at rest than those of the children in the control group. This finding may explain their lack of interest in external stimuli, including interactions with other people.
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April 2014
Volume 19, Issue 4