Research in Brief: Telling Stories Takes Practice Children with autism spectrum disorders may improve their storytelling ability after receiving an intervention targeting specific narrative language features, according to a study published Jan. 1 in Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. But the authors note that greater intensity of intervention may be needed to gain enduring effects ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   April 01, 2014
Research in Brief: Telling Stories Takes Practice
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Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   April 01, 2014
Research in Brief: Telling Stories Takes Practice
The ASHA Leader, April 2014, Vol. 19, 18. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.19042014.17
The ASHA Leader, April 2014, Vol. 19, 18. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.19042014.17
Children with autism spectrum disorders may improve their storytelling ability after receiving an intervention targeting specific narrative language features, according to a study published Jan. 1 in Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. But the authors note that greater intensity of intervention may be needed to gain enduring effects for some language features.
Researchers led by Douglas B. Petersen of the University of Wyoming, Laramie, investigated the effect of a personalized, systematic language intervention on the personal narratives of children with ASD. The authors taught children model stories that highlighted targeted language features, then moved through a series of steps starting with highly supported retellings of the model stories, then independent retells, on to highly supported personal stories, and finally to independent retellings of stories about themselves. Three 6- to 8-year-old boys with ASD participated in 12 individual intervention sessions that targeted two to three story grammar elements (for example, problem and plan) and three to four linguistic complexity elements (for example, causal subordination and adverbs) selected from each boy’s baseline performance.
The boys told independent personal narratives at the end of each baseline, intervention and maintenance session, and the authors analyzed them for presence and sophistication of the targeted features. Results showed the boys’ skill with the targeted language features improved as a function of intervention. There was mixed evidence of maintenance two and seven weeks after intervention.
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April 2014
Volume 19, Issue 4