Inbox: Take the Leap Into Early Intervention I have worked for nine years as the birth to 3 transition program coordinator for the Bellevue (Wash.) School District. I help families at the Kindering Center through the transition process from early intervention into special education, should the child need continued specialized instruction and qualify for services at age ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   April 01, 2014
Inbox: Take the Leap Into Early Intervention
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Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Inbox
Inbox   |   April 01, 2014
Inbox: Take the Leap Into Early Intervention
The ASHA Leader, April 2014, Vol. 19, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.19042014.4
The ASHA Leader, April 2014, Vol. 19, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.19042014.4
I have worked for nine years as the birth to 3 transition program coordinator for the Bellevue (Wash.) School District. I help families at the Kindering Center through the transition process from early intervention into special education, should the child need continued specialized instruction and qualify for services at age 3. With family resource coordinators, I provide resources and begin coaching families about the importance of preschool in preparing children for a challenging kindergarten curriculum, outlining the similarities and differences between IDEA Part C and Part B services, coordinating evaluation teams of early intervention service providers (SLPs, occupational and physical therapists, and special educators), gathering information from these teams to draft initial IEPs, and connecting families with school district services such as integrated special education preschool teams and itinerant therapists.
Working in collaboration, we lay the positive foundation for a child’s special education services. The number of children receiving early intervention services in our district has more than doubled since I started my position, and approximately 30 percent of them no longer need services at age 3. The impact of early intervention services is significant, and the rewards for those who support children and their families are many.
I was recruited by a special education teacher who believed I had the perfect professional expertise to work as this liaison, and I am honored to team with such committed and skilled staff. I encourage SLPs to take the leap and seriously consider working in the growing field of early intervention.
Jan Albright Yalowitz, Seattle

SLPs interested in working with infants and toddlers can find more information on early intervention training at on.asha.org/ei-training.

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FROM THIS ISSUE
April 2014
Volume 19, Issue 4