Research in Brief: To Optimize Auditory Training Results, Compliance Is Key For veterans using hearing aids, compliance with recommended training activities led to hearing gains, according to a study published Dec. 1, 2013, in the American Journal of Audiology (on.asha.org/at-compliance). As researchers expected, compliance appears important for optimizing the outcomes of auditory training. Researchers, led by Theresa Hnath Chisolm at the ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   March 01, 2014
Research in Brief: To Optimize Auditory Training Results, Compliance Is Key
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Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   March 01, 2014
Research in Brief: To Optimize Auditory Training Results, Compliance Is Key
The ASHA Leader, March 2014, Vol. 19, 17. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.19032014.17
The ASHA Leader, March 2014, Vol. 19, 17. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.19032014.17
For veterans using hearing aids, compliance with recommended training activities led to hearing gains, according to a study published Dec. 1, 2013, in the American Journal of Audiology (on.asha.org/at-compliance). As researchers expected, compliance appears important for optimizing the outcomes of auditory training.
Researchers, led by Theresa Hnath Chisolm at the University of South Florida, examined data from a larger study testing the efficacy of Listening and Communication Enhancement—a computer-based auditory training program. They studied LACE training data for five tasks—speech-in-babble, time compression, competing speaker, auditory memory and missing word—from 50 hearing aid users (ages 58 to 85). The authors sought to determine whether there were changes in performance over 20 training sessions, and whether compliance—defined as completing all 20 sessions—influenced performance.
Eighty-four percent of participants completed 20 sessions, with the best outcomes occurring with at least 10 sessions of training for some tasks and up to 20 sessions of training for others. Comparison of baseline to post-test performance revealed statistically significant improvements for the compliant group. Researchers observed no statistically significant improvements for the noncompliant group.
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March 2014
Volume 19, Issue 3