Research in Brief: TBI Rehab Outcomes Vary by Program For patients recovering from a traumatic brain injury, the rehabilitation process—compensating for changes in functioning, adaptation and even community reintegration—can be challenging. Not all rehab programs provide equal services, and with the disparities comes a difference in outcomes, according to a first-of-its-kind study published Sept. 18, 2013, in The Journal ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   March 01, 2014
Research in Brief: TBI Rehab Outcomes Vary by Program
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Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   March 01, 2014
Research in Brief: TBI Rehab Outcomes Vary by Program
The ASHA Leader, March 2014, Vol. 19, 17. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.19032014.17
The ASHA Leader, March 2014, Vol. 19, 17. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.19032014.17
For patients recovering from a traumatic brain injury, the rehabilitation process—compensating for changes in functioning, adaptation and even community reintegration—can be challenging. Not all rehab programs provide equal services, and with the disparities comes a difference in outcomes, according to a first-of-its-kind study published Sept. 18, 2013, in The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation (bit.ly/tbi-rehab).
Baylor Research Institute scientists led by Marie Dahdah set out to identify if patient outcomes at the post-discharge and one-year points varied across 21 Traumatic Brain Injury Model System centers, including the Baylor Institute of Rehabilitation. Researchers analyzed data from 6,975 patients with TBI who were admitted to U.S. rehabilitation centers between 1999 and 2008.
The study did not support the researchers’ hypothesis that, after accounting for differences in patient characteristics and severity of injury, patient outcomes would be similar across centers. Instead, researchers found significant variations—a 25 percent to 45 percent difference between the best-performing site and the site with the lowest outcomes at discharge.
Although differences in outcomes have long been reported in designated trauma centers, this study was the first research to demonstrate that those differences also exist in the rehabilitation context. The team acknowledged that those variances could be attributed to institutional structures, resources and clinical practices, but that more research is needed to determine which of these factors is associated with optimum outcomes.
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March 2014
Volume 19, Issue 3