Research in Brief: Providers With Hearing Loss Communicate Effectively Health care providers with hearing loss already employ effective strategies to enhance patient-provider communication—including telecoil, frequency modulation systems, text transmission over phone lines and amplified phones—according to a survey-based study published Dec. 1, 2013, in the American Journal of Audiology (on.asha.org/providers-with-hearingloss). For this pilot study, researchers led by Alanna R. ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   March 01, 2014
Research in Brief: Providers With Hearing Loss Communicate Effectively
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Hearing Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   March 01, 2014
Research in Brief: Providers With Hearing Loss Communicate Effectively
The ASHA Leader, March 2014, Vol. 19, 17. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.19032014.17
The ASHA Leader, March 2014, Vol. 19, 17. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.19032014.17
Health care providers with hearing loss already employ effective strategies to enhance patient-provider communication—including telecoil, frequency modulation systems, text transmission over phone lines and amplified phones—according to a survey-based study published Dec. 1, 2013, in the American Journal of Audiology (on.asha.org/providers-with-hearingloss).
For this pilot study, researchers led by Alanna R. Trotter at the Seattle University College of Nursing recruited 32 health care professionals with hearing loss from a range of professions and asked them to complete a 28-question survey.
Based on survey results, communication techniques and assistive technologies that providers with hearing loss use include telecoil, frequency modulation systems, text transmission over phone lines, and amplified phones, as well as stethoscope earpiece adapters that allow hearing aid use, telephones with real-time captioning, neckloops (wireless transmitters that provide selective audio input to hearing aids) and interpreters. And they seem to be effective: All participants reported feeling able to communicate effectively with patients at least most of the time. More research is needed to determine if use of these communication techniques has similar results for health care providers with normal hearing.
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March 2014
Volume 19, Issue 3