Research in Brief: Children With Hearing Loss Experience More Fatigue School-age children with hearing loss reported significantly more fatigue than did children with normal hearing in a study published Dec. 23, 2013, in the American Journal of Audiology (on.asha.org/hearing-loss-fatigue). These preliminary data are significant, given the negative academic and psychosocial consequences associated with fatigue. As part of a larger ongoing ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   March 01, 2014
Research in Brief: Children With Hearing Loss Experience More Fatigue
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Hearing Disorders / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   March 01, 2014
Research in Brief: Children With Hearing Loss Experience More Fatigue
The ASHA Leader, March 2014, Vol. 19, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB1.19032014.16
The ASHA Leader, March 2014, Vol. 19, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB1.19032014.16
School-age children with hearing loss reported significantly more fatigue than did children with normal hearing in a study published Dec. 23, 2013, in the American Journal of Audiology (on.asha.org/hearing-loss-fatigue). These preliminary data are significant, given the negative academic and psychosocial consequences associated with fatigue.
As part of a larger ongoing study, researchers led by Benjamin W. Y. Hornsby at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tenn., examined the effect of hearing loss on subjective reports of fatigue in school-age children. The authors obtained subjective ratings of fatigue from 10 children with hearing loss and 10 age-matched children with normal hearing, using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Multidimensional Fatigue Scale. The scale provides a measure of general fatigue, sleep/rest fatigue, cognitive fatigue and an overall composite measure of fatigue.
Preliminary results show that school-age children with hearing loss experience increased fatigue. In addition, the impact of hearing loss on fatigue in school-age children appears pervasive across multiple domains—general, sleep/rest and cognitive fatigue. Further research is needed to determine the underlying mechanisms responsible for fatigue, and to identify factors that may reduce its impact.
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March 2014
Volume 19, Issue 3