Research in Brief: For Compliance, Hearing Aids Are Better Together Fitting bilateral hearing aids simultaneously results in better compliance than sequential fitting, according to an American Journal of Audiology article published Sept. 1. The authors also found that adding a second hearing aid after a relatively short period of monaural use may lead to inconsistent use of both hearing ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   February 01, 2014
Research in Brief: For Compliance, Hearing Aids Are Better Together
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Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   February 01, 2014
Research in Brief: For Compliance, Hearing Aids Are Better Together
The ASHA Leader, February 2014, Vol. 19, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.19022014.np
The ASHA Leader, February 2014, Vol. 19, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB4.19022014.np
Fitting bilateral hearing aids simultaneously results in better compliance than sequential fitting, according to an American Journal of Audiology article published Sept. 1. The authors also found that adding a second hearing aid after a relatively short period of monaural use may lead to inconsistent use of both hearing aids.
Thirty-six adults (ages 64–88; 20 male, 16 female) with hearing impairment participated in the study. Researchers—led by Limor Lavie of the University of Haifa, Israel—fitted 12 participants simultaneously with bilateral hearing aids.
They fitted the remaining participants sequentially with one hearing aid to the left or to the right ear. One month later, they fitted the other ear with a hearing aid for bilateral use.
To analyze the results, the authors relied on participant self-reports after the first and second months of use, and extracted the precise hours of hearing aid use from the devices’ data logs.
Simultaneous fitting resulted in high compliance levels and consistent use throughout the study period; 75 percent of the simultaneously fitted subjects showed high compliance. Sequential fitting resulted in reduced compliance and hours of use after the addition of a second hearing aid, both in clinical scoring and in data logs. Overall, 71 percent of the sequential group participants had reduced compliance in the second month of hearing aid use, and only 25 percent of the sequentially fitted participants showed high compliance during the second month.
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February 2014
Volume 19, Issue 2