Research in Brief: Make Some Noise! … But Wear Earplugs Even when the average noise intensity at a collegiate sporting event doesn’t exceed workplace exposure standards, universities should take steps to protect spectators’ hearing, according to an American Journal of Audiology article published Sept. 1. Recommended steps include warning spectators about the potential dangers of noise exposure, making earplugs ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   February 01, 2014
Research in Brief: Make Some Noise! … But Wear Earplugs
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Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   February 01, 2014
Research in Brief: Make Some Noise! … But Wear Earplugs
The ASHA Leader, February 2014, Vol. 19, 17. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.19022014.17
The ASHA Leader, February 2014, Vol. 19, 17. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB3.19022014.17
Even when the average noise intensity at a collegiate sporting event doesn’t exceed workplace exposure standards, universities should take steps to protect spectators’ hearing, according to an American Journal of Audiology article published Sept. 1.
Recommended steps include warning spectators about the potential dangers of noise exposure, making earplugs available and implementing a hearing conservation program for employees. The research team, led by Utah State University’s Jeffery Blythe Larsen, based these recommendations on a study in which they measured noise levels at 10 intercollegiate basketball games using dosimeters on attendees’ shoulders.
They also measured 20 participants’ hearing thresholds and distortion product otoacoustic emissions just before attending a basketball game and within an hour of the game’s end to see if noise exposure had resulted in hearing threshold changes—that is, a decrease in DPOAE intensity.
All participants demonstrated temporary shifts in pure tone thresholds and reductions in the intensity of their otoacoustic emissions after attending a basketball game. The average decrease in DPOAE intensity across frequencies was 2.02 dB. Dosimeter measurements showed that noise at six of the 10 basketball games exceeded acceptable intensity levels when compared to National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health workplace noise exposure standards.
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February 2014
Volume 19, Issue 2