Research in Brief: Good News for Internationally Adopted Children’s Phonological Processing Skills Parents of school-age children adopted internationally by the age of 2 years can take an optimistic view of their children’s language and literacy development, according to a study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and led by Kathleen A. Scott of Hofstra University in ... Research in Brief
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Research in Brief  |   February 01, 2014
Research in Brief: Good News for Internationally Adopted Children’s Phonological Processing Skills
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International & Global / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research in Brief
Research in Brief   |   February 01, 2014
Research in Brief: Good News for Internationally Adopted Children’s Phonological Processing Skills
The ASHA Leader, February 2014, Vol. 19, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.19022014.16
The ASHA Leader, February 2014, Vol. 19, 16. doi:10.1044/leader.RIB2.19022014.16
Parents of school-age children adopted internationally by the age of 2 years can take an optimistic view of their children’s language and literacy development, according to a study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and led by Kathleen A. Scott of Hofstra University in Hempstead, N .Y.
Prompted by a dearth of studies focused on internationally adopted children’s phonological processing development, researchers examined the phonological processing skills of 45 children adopted from China into the United States (mean age at adoption was 13.09 months). Using norm-referenced measures, researchers assessed the children’s phonological processing, spoken language and reading comprehension skills between the ages of 6 years, 10 months and 9 years, 4 months.
The majority of children scored at or above the average ranges across measures of phonological awareness, phonological memory and rapid naming. The children’s reading comprehension scores were moderately to highly correlated with their phonological processing scores, but age at the time of adoption was not highly correlated with phonological processing or reading comprehension.
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February 2014
Volume 19, Issue 2