Inbox: Stuttering and Speaking a Second Language As I was reading Gail Wilson Lew’s comments about similarities between people who stutter and people who learn a second language, I couldn’t help thinking that people with many different types of communication problems—due, for example, to stroke, cerebral palsy, cleft palate or hearing impairment—would also have the same ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   February 01, 2014
Inbox: Stuttering and Speaking a Second Language
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Inbox
Inbox   |   February 01, 2014
Inbox: Stuttering and Speaking a Second Language
The ASHA Leader, February 2014, Vol. 19, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.19022014.4
The ASHA Leader, February 2014, Vol. 19, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.19022014.4
As I was reading Gail Wilson Lew’s comments about similarities between people who stutter and people who learn a second language, I couldn’t help thinking that people with many different types of communication problems—due, for example, to stroke, cerebral palsy, cleft palate or hearing impairment—would also have the same feelings of frustration and avoid speaking situations. I think that anyone whose ability to communicate for whatever reason should “receive similar treatment.” Speech-language pathology students should be aware of the effects that any communication problem can have on communication.
Pam Britton Reese, Ft. Wayne, Ind.

Thank you for sharing your observation. The analogy can, indeed, be extended to people dealing with any number of difficulties that hamper their ability to communicate.

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FROM THIS ISSUE
February 2014
Volume 19, Issue 2