Inbox: Misleading CAPD Advice In “Is It CAPD or ADHD?” (December 2013), Teri J. Bellis—whom I consider an authority on central auditory processing disorders—indicates that a diagnosis of CAPD cannot be made in a 6-year-old child. She also suggests that auditory training activities be administered that are based on “observed patterns of strengths ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   February 01, 2014
Inbox: Misleading CAPD Advice
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Hearing Disorders / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Inbox
Inbox   |   February 01, 2014
Inbox: Misleading CAPD Advice
The ASHA Leader, February 2014, Vol. 19, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.19022014.4
The ASHA Leader, February 2014, Vol. 19, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.19022014.4
In “Is It CAPD or ADHD?” (December 2013), Teri J. Bellis—whom I consider an authority on central auditory processing disorders—indicates that a diagnosis of CAPD cannot be made in a 6-year-old child. She also suggests that auditory training activities be administered that are based on “observed patterns of strengths and weaknesses.”
Auditory training activities should be administered when the auditory status of the child has been fully evaluated and known to the clinician— and we can and certainly should evaluate hearing status long before age 6, actually from the time of birth or shortly thereafter.
In addition, the online discussion also includes a reference to Earobics, which has a questionable clinical and scientific basis. If used at all—and I question its use—it should not be employed until hearing status is accurately determined.
Maurice H. Miller, New York, N.Y.
Teri J. Bellis responds:
To clarify, my statement about not being able to make a diagnosis until age 7 or 8 referred specifically to the diagnosis of central auditory processing disorder using behavioral tests of central auditory processing available at this time. It is, of course, absolutely critical that hearing status be assessed, and hearing loss diagnosed with follow up (amplification, auditory training, etc.) as soon as possible after birth, following the Joint Committee on Infant Hearing’s 2007 guidelines.
Further, I suggested that—prior to the age at which behavioral CAPD tests could be used for diagnostic purposes—clinicians should begin auditory training activities in cases of suspected CAPD based on observed auditory strengths and weaknesses. As for Earobics and similar programs, we have found evidence of improvements in auditory-related learning and language functions, as well as in auditory electrophysiologic responses, following such targeted computer-assisted activities.
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February 2014
Volume 19, Issue 2