Inbox: Elevator Speeches for Neurological Conditions The article “Changing the Aphasia Narrative” (November 2013) highlights a perception I have heard from many rehabilitation professionals outside of our profession: SLPs are unable to explain the exact nature and benefit of treatments for aphasia. Unfortunately, this seems also to be the case for other neurologically based communication ... Inbox
Free
Inbox  |   January 01, 2014
Inbox: Elevator Speeches for Neurological Conditions
Author Notes
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Inbox
Inbox   |   January 01, 2014
Inbox: Elevator Speeches for Neurological Conditions
The ASHA Leader, January 2014, Vol. 19, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.19012014.4
The ASHA Leader, January 2014, Vol. 19, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.19012014.4
Elevator Speeches for Neurological Conditions
The article “Changing the Aphasia Narrative” (November 2013) highlights a perception I have heard from many rehabilitation professionals outside of our profession: SLPs are unable to explain the exact nature and benefit of treatments for aphasia. Unfortunately, this seems also to be the case for other neurologically based communication disorders.
This inability to present an “elevator speech” to stakeholders is having profound effects as we engage more distant stakeholders, such as politicians, who have the primary voices in health care reform. In the absence of the approach proposed—establishing the problem for stakeholders, offering a solution and making the case for SLPs—our profession may find itself without a voice in health care reform discussions. Our traditional approach (or lack) of describing our services has, in many ways, limited our voice in health care debate and reform as all professions struggle to justify their services and receive reimbursement.
The authors make an important point: Value is “the degree to which something is useful for solving a problem or meeting a goal” and is determined by the view of the key stakeholders—patients and payers. Consequently, SLPs must now effectively articulate a clear understanding of value and other economic-related outcomes that will drive our reimbursement, such as cost-effectiveness of the services that we provide. We should heed the advice in this article, and I hope that SLPs in all settings will read this article carefully and with interest in this time of significant health care reform.
Charles Ellis Jr., Charleston, S.C.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
January 2014
Volume 19, Issue 1