Get Social: How Very Pinteresting Dek:Here’s why Pinterest is the new social media darling for SLPs and audiologists alike. By Tara Roehl If you haven’t heard of Pinterest, you have somehow avoided the latest addicting form of social media. But among the home décor ideas, gift checklists and celebrity pictures, networks of professionals have ... Get Social
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Get Social  |   January 01, 2014
Get Social: How Very Pinteresting
Author Notes
  • Tara Roehl, MS, CCC-SLP, is the owner of Speechy Keen Speech Therapy, a private practice based in Firestone, Colo. She specializes in treating social cognition and executive functioning delays, blogging on these topics (www.speechykeenslp.com/blog) and using apps with gamification theory in treatment. tara@speechykeenslp.com
    Tara Roehl, MS, CCC-SLP, is the owner of Speechy Keen Speech Therapy, a private practice based in Firestone, Colo. She specializes in treating social cognition and executive functioning delays, blogging on these topics (www.speechykeenslp.com/blog) and using apps with gamification theory in treatment. tara@speechykeenslp.com×
Article Information
Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Get Social
Get Social   |   January 01, 2014
Get Social: How Very Pinteresting
The ASHA Leader, January 2014, Vol. 19, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.GS.19012014.np
The ASHA Leader, January 2014, Vol. 19, online only. doi:10.1044/leader.GS.19012014.np
How Very Pinteresting
Dek:Here’s why Pinterest is the new social media darling for SLPs and audiologists alike.
By Tara Roehl
If you haven’t heard of Pinterest, you have somehow avoided the latest addicting form of social media. But among the home décor ideas, gift checklists and celebrity pictures, networks of professionals have developed. Speech-language pathologists are finding one another and sharing something we all value greatly—resources!
Today’s SLPs face many obstacles in their day-to-day professional endeavors: They frequently struggle with limited access to resources, often due to minimal funds and/or work place isolation. They find themselves using the same treatment materials repeatedly over many years and across many sessions. Connecting with other professionals can also be difficult, as many SLPs don’t have other SLPs in their workplace. Social connections help us grow as clinicians by providing the opportunity to share resources (resources that many of us do not have the time nor energy to create, much less re-create).And that’s where Pinterest comes in.
What is Pinterest?
Pinterest is a social network where people save and share links to their favorite resources. What makes Pinterest stand out is that it creates visual links by selecting an image from the resource you are “pinning.” The image helps you quickly recall why you saved a specific resource, as well as easily find it again. Think of it as a library, with each row dedicated to a different person’s favorite resources. But in this library, you are able not only to browse, but also to keep your own copy of all of your favorites—and most of these resources are free!
How it Works
  • Pins.When users find a useful resource, either through Pinterest or just online, they create a “pin.” In essence, they save a “link” to the resource for future reference. You can pin tutorials, printables, favorite websites and even videos. You “pin” items to a virtual “board.”

  • Boards.Each user is allowed an unlimited number of public boards and seven private boards. You can organize these boards in whatever way works for you. One person may organize boards by treatment domains (articulation, pragmatics and so forth) while someone else might organize by type of activity (games, crafts, flashcards and so forth). When you “pin,” you chose which board to place each item you are pinning.

  • Follow.When you find a “pinner” whose board(s) you enjoy, you can decide to “follow” them. When you log in to Pinterest, your homepage will include what these pinners have recently added to their boards. You can choose to follow specific boards or a given user’s entire public collection.

Why Pin?
People use Pinterest for many reasons, among them to get inspired, to connect with others with similar interests and to improve themselves. As an SLP, you can enlist Pinterest to find the latest research information or activities to use with your third-graders. Instead of being tied to searching the Internet for hours or purchasing expensive materials, a quick Pinterest search can provide a plethora of visually represented paths for you to explore. And, because Pinterest is Web-based, you no longer have to fear leaving materials on the kitchen table or at your other setting. Your Pinterest boards are available on any Internet-enabled device, including your tablet, smart phone and computer. You can get started today by following a few simple steps.
How to get started
You can start using Pinterest today by following a few simple steps:
  • Sign up.You can create a log-in using your e-mail, Facebook or Twitter account. It only takes a few minutes!

  • Follow boards. I’ve compiled a list of SLP boards to follow to get you started. You can find it at www.pinterest.com/speechykeenslp.

  • Search.Looking for something specific? Try typing some keywords into the search box. Keep them simple to yield more results.

Although Pinterest is relatively new to the social media scene, SLPs, audiologists and plenty of other professionals have already harnessed it to organize professional information. Jump in and see why.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
January 2014
Volume 19, Issue 1