From the Journals: Ultrasound Is Valid for Studying /r/ Production Qualitative and quantitative ultrasound measures are valid characterizations of the accuracy of children’s /r/ sounds, according to study results published in the August 2013 American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology (on.asha.org/ultrasound-measures). The findings suggest that clinicians should encourage pharyngeal constriction while allowing each child to find the /r/ tongue shape ... From the Journals
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From the Journals  |   January 01, 2014
From the Journals: Ultrasound Is Valid for Studying /r/ Production
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   January 01, 2014
From the Journals: Ultrasound Is Valid for Studying /r/ Production
The ASHA Leader, January 2014, Vol. 19, 40. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ2.19012014.40
The ASHA Leader, January 2014, Vol. 19, 40. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ2.19012014.40
Ultrasound Is Valid for Studying /r/Production
Qualitative and quantitative ultrasound measures are valid characterizations of the accuracy of children’s /r/ sounds, according to study results published in the August 2013 American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology (on.asha.org/ultrasound-measures). The findings suggest that clinicians should encourage pharyngeal constriction while allowing each child to find the /r/ tongue shape that best fits his or her vocal tract.
Led by Harriet B. Klein at New York University, researchers explored relationships among perceptual, ultrasound and acoustic measurements of children’s correct and misarticulated /r/ sounds. The authors collected longitudinal data documenting changes across these parameters from two children who acquired /r/ over a period of intervention. They compared these with data collected from children with typical speech.
The study included three children whose typical speech was recorded once and two children whose /r/ misarticulations were recorded over seven to eight months. The authors collected perceptual ratings of accuracy, ultrasound measures of tongue shape and acoustic measurements of the F3–F2 distance (a measure of formant frequency changes in speech) from /r/ produced in nonwords.
There were significant associations among perceptual, ultrasound and acoustic measures of /r/ accuracy. Including quantitative tongue-shape measurements improved the match between ultrasound and perceptual/acoustic data. In addition, perceptually incorrect /r/ productions featured posteriorly located, peaked tongue shapes. Of the children who were seen longitudinally, one developed a bunched /r/ (when the tongue is pulled to the back of the mouth) and one demonstrated retroflexion (when the tongue’s tip touches the roof of the mouth). The children with typical speech also differed in their tongue shapes.
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January 2014
Volume 19, Issue 1