Inbox: Stuttering Study Tim Mackesey of Atlanta (Inbox, October 2013) misrepresents the conclusions of the Australian study that investigated the natural history of stuttering to 4 years of age and was recently published in the journal Pediatrics. Far from suggesting that treatment for stuttering in preschool children can be ignored or is ... Inbox
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Inbox  |   December 01, 2013
Inbox: Stuttering Study
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Inbox
Inbox   |   December 01, 2013
Inbox: Stuttering Study
The ASHA Leader, December 2013, Vol. 18, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.18122013.4
The ASHA Leader, December 2013, Vol. 18, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.18122013.4
Tim Mackesey of Atlanta (Inbox, October 2013) misrepresents the conclusions of the Australian study that investigated the natural history of stuttering to 4 years of age and was recently published in the journal Pediatrics.
Far from suggesting that treatment for stuttering in preschool children can be ignored or is not necessary, the study's conclusions include the recommendation that treatment be started if the child is upset or in distress, if the parents are concerned, or if the child withdraws from talking. Related to that recommendation is the robust research finding that the effectiveness of treatment with the Lidcombe Program is not compromised if intervention is delayed up to one year post-onset. Even so, the Lidcombe Program guidelines recommend intervention before 1 year if the child or the family demonstrates concern, or if the child develops negative feelings toward communication.
Joseph S. Attanasio, Montclair, N.J.
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December 2013
Volume 18, Issue 12