ASHA News: Are You on ASHAsphere? Here are some of the recent posts: After 23 years working in schools, SLP Tracy Sippl found herself "looking for a different avenue for delivering speech-language pathology services. Simply, I was ready for a change." She discovered telepractice—not as a private practitioner, but as an employee of ... ASHA News
ASHA News  |   November 01, 2013
ASHA News: Are You on ASHAsphere?
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ASHA News & Member Stories / ASHA News
ASHA News   |   November 01, 2013
ASHA News: Are You on ASHAsphere?
The ASHA Leader, November 2013, Vol. 18, 64. doi:10.1044/leader.AN11.18112013.64
The ASHA Leader, November 2013, Vol. 18, 64. doi:10.1044/leader.AN11.18112013.64
Here are some of the recent posts:
After 23 years working in schools, SLP Tracy Sippl found herself "looking for a different avenue for delivering speech-language pathology services. Simply, I was ready for a change." She discovered telepractice—not as a private practitioner, but as an employee of a company that contracts with school systems. She offers guidance for taking this step, concluding "students are able to accomplish more in less time compared with face-to-face therapy. Teletherapy has its own rewards, and students find ways to show you how important you are to them. Once, as I was working with a kindergarten student, she looked at me and exclaimed, 'Hi, Mrs. Sippl! I'm so excited to see you today! I love you!'"
Maria Del Duca firmly believes in the importance of play, but the early intervention specialist contends that many parents don't know how to play with their children. "We need to teach parents how to play so their children can continue to develop during the time we are not present as service providers and throughout their childhood," she says. She offers pointers for getting parents to buy in to the concept, and also gives tips for parents who ask about the "right" way to play.
Fluency expert Craig Coleman weighs in on the "wait and see" approach for a child with early stuttering. For a child with normal disfluencies, this approach is much more acceptable than for a child with early stuttering, he says. But how do you tell the difference? Coleman offers a chart that describes some characteristics of "normal disfluency" and "stuttering," as well as other risk factors for clinician assessment.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
November 2013
Volume 18, Issue 11