Inbox: A Pioneer in Helping Patients With Aphasia The September Limelight ("Guides for the Long Journey Back") reminded me of a friend and colleague, William Pitts. Bill, now in his 90s, spent most of his career as an aphasiologist at Highland View Hospital in Cleveland. He was a visionary and inventor, always tinkering with ... Inbox
Inbox  |   November 01, 2013
Inbox: A Pioneer in Helping Patients With Aphasia
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Language Disorders / Aphasia / Inbox
Inbox   |   November 01, 2013
Inbox: A Pioneer in Helping Patients With Aphasia
The ASHA Leader, November 2013, Vol. 18, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.18112013.4
The ASHA Leader, November 2013, Vol. 18, 4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN2.18112013.4
The September Limelight ("Guides for the Long Journey Back") reminded me of a friend and colleague, William Pitts.
Bill, now in his 90s, spent most of his career as an aphasiologist at Highland View Hospital in Cleveland. He was a visionary and inventor, always tinkering with technology, envisioning it as a partial solution for independent home practice for persons post-stroke. He wrote software for the C.H.A.T. (Computerized Home Aphasia Therapy) program, incorporating strategies he had used throughout his long career. In 1980, with a small grant from Easter Seals, he was able to put a program into the home of interested patients. A Tandy computer with a floppy disk—and a small portable television serving as its monitor—was the home computer at that time. Bill often spoke of self-esteem regained by stroke survivors as they went into their home office to practice speaking independently.
Today, more than 30 years later, I still introduce the C.H.A.T. program to appropriate patients. A patient recently told me, "It's the first thing that helped me in two years." As technological advances increasingly converge with health care service delivery, what is stress for many fuels the entrepreneurial spirit in some who, like Bill Pitts, blend creativity, evidence-based practice and inspiration to help the lives of the people we serve.
Mary Spremulli, Punta Gorda, Fla.
Correction
The infographic on p. 42 of the October issue incorrectly referenced the incidence of HIV. The information was related to the incidence of HPV.
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November 2013
Volume 18, Issue 11