From the Journals: How Much Articulatory Effort? It Depends on the Consonant In a comparison of articulatory contact pressure, oral air pressure and speech acoustics for conversational versus clear speech—and how these measures relate to listener perception—researchers found articulatory effort to be increased by varying degrees depending on the consonant uttered. The study, published in the June 2013 ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   September 01, 2013
From the Journals: How Much Articulatory Effort? It Depends on the Consonant
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Speech, Voice & Prosody / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   September 01, 2013
From the Journals: How Much Articulatory Effort? It Depends on the Consonant
The ASHA Leader, September 2013, Vol. 18, 39. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ3.18092013.39
The ASHA Leader, September 2013, Vol. 18, 39. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ3.18092013.39
In a comparison of articulatory contact pressure, oral air pressure and speech acoustics for conversational versus clear speech—and how these measures relate to listener perception—researchers found articulatory effort to be increased by varying degrees depending on the consonant uttered. The study, published in the June 2013 issue of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, also found that duration at both the segment and phrase level was important for predicting listeners' ratings of speech clarity.
Speakers can adopt "clear speech" if a communication breaks down because of the listener's hearing difficulties, background noise or a different primary language. Researchers asked 12 adults with normal speech to produce monosyllables in a phrase using conversational and clear speech. Target phonemes were /t, d, s, z, l, n/. Articulatory contact pressure was measured at a point of articulatory contact; an open catheter in the posterior oral cavity sensed oral air pressure.
The greatest changes in articulatory effort occurred for the phonemes /t, d/.  Articulatory contact pressure was increased to a greater extent in clear speech for /t, d, z/. Oral air pressure was increased to a greater extent for /t, d/. Acoustic changes also occurred in terms of segment durations, speaking rate, and consonant and vowel durations. A regression analysis indicated that segment duration was the strongest predictor of listener ratings of speech clarity, followed by an index of articulatory effort and speaking rate.
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September 2013
Volume 18, Issue 9