From the Journals: Greater Understanding of Families' Language Use Leads to Better Support Communication between parents and children is a complex matter, unique to each family. So practitioners need to be better informed about intergenerational language practices in minority-language families, says a study in the February 2013 issue of the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. Parents need practitioners' support to ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   July 01, 2013
From the Journals: Greater Understanding of Families' Language Use Leads to Better Support
Author Notes
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   July 01, 2013
From the Journals: Greater Understanding of Families' Language Use Leads to Better Support
The ASHA Leader, July 2013, Vol. 18, 33. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ2.18072013.33
The ASHA Leader, July 2013, Vol. 18, 33. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ2.18072013.33
Communication between parents and children is a complex matter, unique to each family. So practitioners need to be better informed about intergenerational language practices in minority-language families, says a study in the February 2013 issue of the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. Parents need practitioners' support to make language-use decisions that are self-enhancing and congruent with their family's needs.
The author investigated the language practices of 10 bilingual, Chinese/English-speaking, immigrant mothers with their children with autism spectrum disorders. Her aim was to understand the nature of the language practices, their constraints and their impact. She used in-depth phenomenological interviews with thematic and narrative analyses to yield themes.
Interviewees reported that they adopted the language practices they perceived to be most advantageous for acquiring services and maintaining wellness. They valued Chinese language, but did not pursue its use if they thought it would hinder the children's overall English acquisition. All the mothers believed bilingualism made learning more challenging, and many believed it caused confusion or exacerbated disabilities. Their deficit views of bilingualism commonly were reinforced by professionals. All the mothers were motivated to help their children learn English, but had no assistance to do so. Practices were sustainable only when they were aligned with families' preferred communication patterns.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
July 2013
Volume 18, Issue 7