From the Journals: To Understand Bilingual Clients' Speech Perception, First Consider Their Attitudes To fully understand bilingual clients' perception of English speech, hearing professionals should consider their attitudes about language in addition to language background, according to a study published in the December 2012 issue of the American Journal of Audiology. Hypothesizing that linguistic variables alone cannot fully account for bilingual listeners' ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   July 01, 2013
From the Journals: To Understand Bilingual Clients' Speech Perception, First Consider Their Attitudes
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Hearing & Speech Perception / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   July 01, 2013
From the Journals: To Understand Bilingual Clients' Speech Perception, First Consider Their Attitudes
The ASHA Leader, July 2013, Vol. 18, 33. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ1.18072013.33
The ASHA Leader, July 2013, Vol. 18, 33. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ1.18072013.33
To fully understand bilingual clients' perception of English speech, hearing professionals should consider their attitudes about language in addition to language background, according to a study published in the December 2012 issue of the American Journal of Audiology.
Hypothesizing that linguistic variables alone cannot fully account for bilingual listeners' perception of English running speech, the authors investigated how the combination of linguistic factors and attitude affect bilingual processing of temporally degraded English passages.
Thirty-six bilinguals participated in the study. Bilingual people completed questionnaires to assess their language backgrounds, willingness to communicate, and self-perceived communication competency in English. Participants listened to English passage pairs from the Connected Speech Test, presented at 45 dB HL at three rates—unprocessed, expanded, compressed—in quiet and in noise.
The most significant linguistic variables were language proficiency measures, accounting for the largest amount of variance in performance across most conditions. Willingness to communicate and self-perceived communication competency both were associated with performance and contributed to regression models. Performance in noise was more difficult to predict than in quiet.
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July 2013
Volume 18, Issue 7