From the Journals: Alzheimer's Disease Prevention Moves a Step Closer A new drug to prevent the early stages of Alzheimer's disease could enter clinical trials in a few years, according to a study published Jan. 31, 2013, in the journal PLOS ONE. The drug needs to be tested for safety before it can enter human trials, but if it passes ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   June 01, 2013
From the Journals: Alzheimer's Disease Prevention Moves a Step Closer
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Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   June 01, 2013
From the Journals: Alzheimer's Disease Prevention Moves a Step Closer
The ASHA Leader, June 2013, Vol. 18, 36-37. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ4.18062013.36
The ASHA Leader, June 2013, Vol. 18, 36-37. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ4.18062013.36
A new drug to prevent the early stages of Alzheimer's disease could enter clinical trials in a few years, according to a study published Jan. 31, 2013, in the journal PLOS ONE. The drug needs to be tested for safety before it can enter human trials, but if it passes this hurdle the aim would be to give the drug to people with mild symptoms of memory loss before they develop the illness.
Alzheimer's is the most common type of dementia, which affects 820,000 people in the United Kingdom. One in three people older than 65 will die with dementia. The disease begins when a protein called amyloid-ß starts to clump together in senile plaques in the brain, damaging nerve cells and leading to memory loss and confusion.
David Allsop and Mark Taylor at Lancaster University have created a new drug that can reduce the number of senile plaques by one-third, and can double the number of new nerve cells in a particular region of the brain associated with memory. It also markedly reduced the amount of brain inflammation and oxidative damage associated with the disease.
The researchers tested the drug on transgenic mice containing two mutant human genes linked to inherited forms of Alzheimer's, so that they would develop some of the changes associated with the illness. The drug is designed to cross the blood-brain barrier and prevent amyloid-ß molecules from sticking together to form plaques.
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June 2013
Volume 18, Issue 6