From the Journals: Chronic Seizures Associated With Decreased Language Skills Children with epilepsy may be more disfluent overall than their typically developing peers, according to a study in press for the Journal of Fluency Disorders. The study adds to emerging literature charting poorer language skills and listener perceptions of verbal ability in children with chronic seizure activity, and bolsters the ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   June 01, 2013
From the Journals: Chronic Seizures Associated With Decreased Language Skills
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Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   June 01, 2013
From the Journals: Chronic Seizures Associated With Decreased Language Skills
The ASHA Leader, June 2013, Vol. 18, 36. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ3.18062013.36
The ASHA Leader, June 2013, Vol. 18, 36. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ3.18062013.36
Children with epilepsy may be more disfluent overall than their typically developing peers, according to a study in press for the Journal of Fluency Disorders. The study adds to emerging literature charting poorer language skills and listener perceptions of verbal ability in children with chronic seizure activity, and bolsters the literature suggesting that disfluency during spoken language tasks may be a subtle marker of expressive language impairment.
Researchers assessed the relationship between fluency and language demand in children with epilepsy, a group that typically demonstrates depressed language skills. Then the researchers analyzed 52 children's disfluency types and frequencies using their elicited narratives. Half of the children had localization-related epilepsy, and the rest were age- and gender-matched typically developing peers.
During narrative productions, children with localization-related epilepsy were found to be significantly more disfluent overall than their matched, typically developing peers, and they demonstrated a higher proportion of stutter-like disfluencies, particularly prolongations.
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June 2013
Volume 18, Issue 6