From the Journals: Seizures Decrease Children's Language Performance Over Time Continued seizures—or prolonged exposure to the medications used to control them—may produce decrements in children's language performance over time, according to a study in the March-April 2013 International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders. The authors strongly recommend a greater awareness of seizure disorder among speech-language pathologists, as well as ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   June 01, 2013
From the Journals: Seizures Decrease Children's Language Performance Over Time
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Development / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   June 01, 2013
From the Journals: Seizures Decrease Children's Language Performance Over Time
The ASHA Leader, June 2013, Vol. 18, 36. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ2.18062013.36
The ASHA Leader, June 2013, Vol. 18, 36. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ2.18062013.36
Continued seizures—or prolonged exposure to the medications used to control them—may produce decrements in children's language performance over time, according to a study in the March-April 2013 International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders. The authors strongly recommend a greater awareness of seizure disorder among speech-language pathologists, as well as baseline testing at first diagnosis so changes over time can be documented reliably (see "Baseline Benefits").
Researchers sought to compare the language skills of 25 children with epilepsy—some with recent onset seizures and some with chronic seizure activity for more than three years—using a mix of standardized tests, analysis of elicited narratives and listener judgments of the children's narratives. They divided the children into two groups (recent and chronic) and age-matched them to 25 typically functioning peers. In addition to completing standardized IQ and language testing, children produced narratives to accompany the book "Frog, Where Are You?" Researchers analyzed their narratives for syntax, vocabulary and narrative components. Forty-five adult listeners each blindly rated nine narratives to create a large pool of listener judgments.
Children with chronic epilepsy showed the greatest differences in language skill and listener judgments from their unaffected peers. Differences were smaller for children whose epilepsy was of more recent onset and for their matched peers.
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June 2013
Volume 18, Issue 6