From the Journals: Visual Analog Scales Reveal Reductions in Tinnitus Severity Visual analog scales of loudness and annoyance are valid and sensitive measurements for capturing changes in tinnitus severity in patients with chronic tinnitus, according to a study in the December 2012 issue of the American Journal of Audiology. Developing interventions for chronic tinnitus requires sensitive and clinically responsive tools to ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   June 01, 2013
From the Journals: Visual Analog Scales Reveal Reductions in Tinnitus Severity
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Hearing Disorders / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   June 01, 2013
From the Journals: Visual Analog Scales Reveal Reductions in Tinnitus Severity
The ASHA Leader, June 2013, Vol. 18, 36. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ1.18062013.36
The ASHA Leader, June 2013, Vol. 18, 36. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ1.18062013.36
Visual analog scales of loudness and annoyance are valid and sensitive measurements for capturing changes in tinnitus severity in patients with chronic tinnitus, according to a study in the December 2012 issue of the American Journal of Audiology.
Developing interventions for chronic tinnitus requires sensitive and clinically responsive tools to measure treatment-induced changes in tinnitus loudness and annoyance. In this study, the authors evaluated the psychometric properties of patient-reported visual analog scales for measuring these subjectively perceived changes.
Researchers analyzed data from a single-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study of acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation in 63 German patients with chronic tinnitus. The goal was to assess the reliability, validity and minimally clinically identifiable difference—the smallest difference in a score that is considered to be important, relevant or worthwhile—of the visual analog scales of loudness and annoyance. Subjects completed these scales at screening, at baseline and during five visits during the clinical study's 16 weeks.
Visual analog scales of loudness and annoyance showed good test-retest reliability of .8 and .79, respectively. In terms of convergent validity, VAS loudness and VAS annoyance correlated well with the tinnitus questionnaire at all clinical visits. Minimally clinically identifiable difference estimates clustered between 10 and 15 points.
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June 2013
Volume 18, Issue 6