From the Journals: Cochlear Implants' Processing Limitations Most Pronounced in Quiet Cochlear implant processing limitations primarily take their toll on signal recognition in quiet, and account for poor speech recognition and language/phonological deficits in children who use them, according to a study published in the February 2013 issue of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. The results suggest that ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   May 01, 2013
From the Journals: Cochlear Implants' Processing Limitations Most Pronounced in Quiet
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Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   May 01, 2013
From the Journals: Cochlear Implants' Processing Limitations Most Pronounced in Quiet
The ASHA Leader, May 2013, Vol. 18, 32. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ3.18052013.32
The ASHA Leader, May 2013, Vol. 18, 32. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ3.18052013.32
Cochlear implant processing limitations primarily take their toll on signal recognition in quiet, and account for poor speech recognition and language/phonological deficits in children who use them, according to a study published in the February 2013 issue of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. The results suggest that teachers and clinicians should teach language and phonology directly, and maximize signal-to-noise levels in the classroom.
Common wisdom suggests that listening in noise poses disproportionately greater difficulty for listeners with cochlear implants than for peers with normal hearing. This study examined phonological, language and cognitive skills that might help explain speech-in-noise abilities for children with cochlear implants. Researchers tested three groups of kindergartners—19 with normal hearing, eight with hearing aids, and 27 with cochlear implants—on speech recognition in quiet and noise, and on tasks thought to underlie the abilities of phonological awareness, general language and cognitive skills. These last measures were used as predictor variables in regression analyses with speech-in-noise scores as dependent variables.
Compared to children with normal hearing, children with cochlear implants did not perform as well on speech recognition in noise or on most other measures, including recognition in quiet. Two surprising results were that noise effects were consistent across groups, and scores on other measures did not explain any group differences in speech recognition.
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May 2013
Volume 18, Issue 5