Inbox: Speaking Your Clients' Language Recently when I was attending physical therapy here in my Tennessee retirement community, my 28-year-old physical therapist (originally from California) commented on the regional dialects that she has encountered in this region: "You know, I discovered that the ladies around here were very hesitant to follow my home exercise programs, ... Inbox
Inbox  |   April 01, 2013
Inbox: Speaking Your Clients' Language
Author Notes
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Inbox
Inbox   |   April 01, 2013
Inbox: Speaking Your Clients' Language
The ASHA Leader, April 2013, Vol. 18, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.18042013.3
The ASHA Leader, April 2013, Vol. 18, 3. doi:10.1044/leader.IN1.18042013.3
Recently when I was attending physical therapy here in my Tennessee retirement community, my 28-year-old physical therapist (originally from California) commented on the regional dialects that she has encountered in this region: "You know, I discovered that the ladies around here were very hesitant to follow my home exercise programs, until I started to speak in their local dialect. When I began to speak like a native, they began to follow my detailed instructions religiously."
When this month's ASHA Leader arrived, I read the article by Irene Gilbert Torres with great interest. It has prodded me to investigate the effects of culture on the provision of health care here in the mountains. Research demonstrates that establishing trust in the clinical setting is essential to meeting individual health care needs here. Though regional speech patterns constitute only a small part of one's culture, it seems like an important one to consider.
In her paper, "Working With Clients of Appalachian Culture," for the 2010 American Counseling Association Conference, Kathryn A. Russ contended that "Working with people of Appalachian culture requires multicultural expertise, just as working with other minorities does. Appalachians display regional differences that influence how therapy and interventions should be addressed and, even though they may be an invisible minority, the same care is required in working with them as for more obvious minorities." The 1984 TV movie "Dollmaker," with Jane Fonda, is also worth checking out on YouTube.
Tom Carter
Crossville, Tenn.
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
April 2013
Volume 18, Issue 4