From the Journals: When Planning Interventions for Children With Autism, Consider Nonverbal Skills Some children with severe language delays do not attain phrase or fluent speech until age 4 or later, according to a study published online in Pediatrics (March 4). The results highlight the importance of evaluating and considering nonverbal skills—both cognitive and social—when developing interventions and setting goals for language development. ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   April 01, 2013
From the Journals: When Planning Interventions for Children With Autism, Consider Nonverbal Skills
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Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   April 01, 2013
From the Journals: When Planning Interventions for Children With Autism, Consider Nonverbal Skills
The ASHA Leader, April 2013, Vol. 18, 39. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ3.18042013.39
The ASHA Leader, April 2013, Vol. 18, 39. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ3.18042013.39
Some children with severe language delays do not attain phrase or fluent speech until age 4 or later, according to a study published online in Pediatrics (March 4). The results highlight the importance of evaluating and considering nonverbal skills—both cognitive and social—when developing interventions and setting goals for language development.
Researchers examined the prevalence and predictors of language attainment in children with autism spectrum disorders and severe language delay. They hypothesized more severe autism symptoms and lower intelligence among children who do not attain phrase/fluent speech, with nonverbal intelligence and social engagement emerging as the strongest predictors of outcome.
Scientists gathered data from 535 children with ASDs age 8 and older who acquired phrase speech after age 4 and examined predictors of phrase and fluent speech attainment and age at acquisition, respectively.
No demographic or child psychiatric characteristics were associated with phrase speech attainment after age 4, whereas slightly older age and increased internalizing symptoms were associated with fluent speech. In the multivariate analyses, higher nonverbal IQ and less social impairment were both independently associated with the acquisition of phrase and fluent speech, as well as earlier age at acquisition. Stereotyped behavior/repetitive interests and sensory interests were not associated with delayed speech acquisition.
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April 2013
Volume 18, Issue 4