From the Journals: Toddlers' Distress Noises May Indicate an ASD Distress vocalizations may be a potential early indicator of autism spectrum disorders, according to a study in the December 2012 issue of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, but the authors recommend further examination. Additionally, the study highlighted the importance of early communicative vocalizations for later language development. ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   April 01, 2013
From the Journals: Toddlers' Distress Noises May Indicate an ASD
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Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   April 01, 2013
From the Journals: Toddlers' Distress Noises May Indicate an ASD
The ASHA Leader, April 2013, Vol. 18, 39. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ2.18042013.39
The ASHA Leader, April 2013, Vol. 18, 39. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ2.18042013.39
Distress vocalizations may be a potential early indicator of autism spectrum disorders, according to a study in the December 2012 issue of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, but the authors recommend further examination. Additionally, the study highlighted the importance of early communicative vocalizations for later language development.
Researchers examined the vocalizations of children with ASDs in the second year of life, to determine these vocalizations' relationship to other areas of development. The authors studied vocalizations in 125 children age 18–24 months: 50 later diagnosed with ASDs; 25 with developmental delays in which ASDs were ruled out; and 50 typically developing children. Researchers coded video-recorded behavior samples from the Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales Developmental Profile to obtain precise measures of vocalizations.
The group with ASDs used a significantly lower proportion of vocalizations with speech sounds, and a significantly higher proportion of atypical vocalizations than typically developing children. Those with ASDs used a significantly higher proportion of distress vocalizations than the typically developing group and the group with a developmental disorder. The frequency of vocalizations with speech sounds for children with ASDs correlated significantly with developmental levels both concurrently and predictively. For this group, communicative vocalizations late in the second year uniquely predict expressive language outcome at age 3.
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April 2013
Volume 18, Issue 4