From the Journals: Developmental Level Determines Best Linguistic Input for Children With Autism A child's developmental level may determine what type of linguistic input best facilitates language learning, according to a study published in the February 2013 issue of the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. The data suggest that children with autism spectrum disorders and minimal linguistic skills may benefit from parental language ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   April 01, 2013
From the Journals: Developmental Level Determines Best Linguistic Input for Children With Autism
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Development / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   April 01, 2013
From the Journals: Developmental Level Determines Best Linguistic Input for Children With Autism
The ASHA Leader, April 2013, Vol. 18, 39. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ1.18042013.39
The ASHA Leader, April 2013, Vol. 18, 39. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ1.18042013.39
A child's developmental level may determine what type of linguistic input best facilitates language learning, according to a study published in the February 2013 issue of the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. The data suggest that children with autism spectrum disorders and minimal linguistic skills may benefit from parental language input that follows the child's focus of attention. However, children with ASDs who are verbally fluent may need more advanced language input to facilitate language development.
Researchers digitally capturedand coded parent-child play samples—using a standard toy set—for children's engagement with objects and communication acts, and for parents' verbal responses to play and communication. The authors examined longitudinal associations between these two categories of responsiveness and language comprehension and production one year later in 40 toddlers and preschoolers diagnosed with an ASD.
After controlling for parent education, child engagement and initial language level, those parent directives for language that followed the child's focus of attention accounted for unique variance in predicting comprehension and production one year later. In a series of exploratory analyses, the authors found that parent comments that followed into the child's focus of attention also accounted for unique variance in later comprehension and production for children who were minimally verbal.
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April 2013
Volume 18, Issue 4