Blogjam: Quality Apps Cost Money As much as everyone loves free things, the Speech Dudes offer a "contentious" reminder that it's often better to pay for quality: "In economics, there's a concept known as the 'anchor point.' As the name suggests, it's the selling price at which you drop your anchor when you bring a ... Blogjam
Blogjam  |   April 01, 2013
Blogjam: Quality Apps Cost Money
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Blogjam
Blogjam   |   April 01, 2013
Blogjam: Quality Apps Cost Money
The ASHA Leader, April 2013, Vol. 18, 11. doi:10.1044/leader.BGJ4.18042013.11
The ASHA Leader, April 2013, Vol. 18, 11. doi:10.1044/leader.BGJ4.18042013.11
As much as everyone loves free things, the Speech Dudes offer a "contentious" reminder that it's often better to pay for quality:
"In economics, there's a concept known as the 'anchor point.' As the name suggests, it's the selling price at which you drop your anchor when you bring a new product or service to market. Once an anchor is set, new folks tend to cluster around your safe harbor and drop similar anchors. And when people start purchasing products, this anchor becomes the standard against all other similar products are measured. The average price of an app in 2012 was $1.58, which is 87 cents cheaper than a cup of espresso-based coffee.
"The best anchor point for a consumer is usually free. If I want stuff, and the stuff costs me nothing, how bad can that be? Well, the obvious thing is that there's a little thing called quality that gets factored into the equation, but you'd be surprised (or not) how much quality will be sacrificed on the altar of Free. And in the early days of iPhones and iPads, the majority of apps were free—which became, and remains, the anchor."
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April 2013
Volume 18, Issue 4