Inbox: Questions About Future Technologies I read the article "Future Present" in the January issue of The ASHA Leader with frustrated disappointment. I thought of Christopher Reeve, whose virtual ambulation across a stage expressed his wish to walk. It was heartbreaking. Reeve ought to have informed his audience more about nerve repair and cortical reorganization ... Inbox
Inbox  |   March 01, 2013
Inbox: Questions About Future Technologies
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Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Inbox
Inbox   |   March 01, 2013
Inbox: Questions About Future Technologies
The ASHA Leader, March 2013, Vol. 18, 4-5. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.18032013.4
The ASHA Leader, March 2013, Vol. 18, 4-5. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.18032013.4
I read the article "Future Present" in the January issue of The ASHA Leader with frustrated disappointment. I thought of Christopher Reeve, whose virtual ambulation across a stage expressed his wish to walk. It was heartbreaking. Reeve ought to have informed his audience more about nerve repair and cortical reorganization if he wanted to be helpful. The "11 Up-and-Coming Technologies" was a lot like a Reevian virtual moment.
Improved videostroboscopy, high-speed video and depth kymography may aid in laryngeal disorder diagnosis, but will they—much like acoustic analysis in its day—have clinical relevance? Where is discussion of a technique for laryngeal MRI or how airflow hydrodynamics relates to dysphonia? Where is an NIH-type mechanism underlying this research? Until physiology is part of our understanding of human sound production, diagnosis—much less synthesis—is not achievable.
Uses of brain implants, transcranial stimulation and direct current stimulation read too much like a Vitalstim brochure. Where is the underlying mechanism being addressed in what was offered? The brain isn't a melon. Where is mention of stimulation specificity (Penfield-type [antiquated], Merznich-type [unrefined], or Birthe Rubehn at the University of Freiburg)? Of interest, however, was discussion of neuroimaging in areas of TBI and CVA, where medical neurology is well advanced. Would neurogenics benefit from neuroimaging if we offered curriculum preparing students to participate in this burgeoning field? The Leader isn't Advance. It ought to be more than glossy "blue sky" if it truly desires to inform professionals.
George Charpied
Pittsford, N.Y.
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March 2013
Volume 18, Issue 3