From the Journals: Patients With Post-Concussion Syndrome Show Brain Disruptions Magnetic resonance imaging reveals changes in the brains of people with post-concussion syndrome, according to a study published online in the December 2012 issue of Radiology. Researchers hope the results point the way to improved detection and treatment for the disorder. Post-concussion syndrome affects approximately 20 to 30 percent of ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   March 01, 2013
From the Journals: Patients With Post-Concussion Syndrome Show Brain Disruptions
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Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   March 01, 2013
From the Journals: Patients With Post-Concussion Syndrome Show Brain Disruptions
The ASHA Leader, March 2013, Vol. 18, 32-33. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ6.18032013.32
The ASHA Leader, March 2013, Vol. 18, 32-33. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ6.18032013.32
Magnetic resonance imaging reveals changes in the brains of people with post-concussion syndrome, according to a study published online in the December 2012 issue of Radiology. Researchers hope the results point the way to improved detection and treatment for the disorder.
Post-concussion syndrome affects approximately 20 to 30 percent of people who suffer mild traumatic brain injury, defined by the World Health Organization as a traumatic event causing brief loss of consciousness and/or transient memory dysfunction or disorientation. Symptoms include headache, poor concentration and memory difficulty. Conventional neuroimaging cannot distinguish which patients with mild TBI will develop post-concussion syndrome.
The study used MRI to examine the brains of 23 patients with mild TBI who had post-traumatic symptoms shortly after injury and 18 age-matched healthy controls. MRIs were taken during a resting state—when the brain is not engaged in a specific task—such as when the mind wanders or while daydreaming. The resting state is thought to involve connections among a number of regions, with the default mode network playing a particularly important role.
Results showed that after mild head injury, communication and information integration in the brain were disrupted among key neural structures. Researchers hypothesize that the brain may tap into different neural resources to compensate for the impaired function.
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March 2013
Volume 18, Issue 3