From the Journals: Virtual Reality a Better Predictor of Cognitive Impairment? Compared with paper-and-pencil tests, a virtual reality test developed at the University of Toronto Scarborough may better predict whether a cognitive impairment will have real-world consequences, according to a study in the June 2012 issue of Applied Neuropsychology Adult. The Multitasking in the City Task asks participants to navigate their ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   March 01, 2013
From the Journals: Virtual Reality a Better Predictor of Cognitive Impairment?
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Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   March 01, 2013
From the Journals: Virtual Reality a Better Predictor of Cognitive Impairment?
The ASHA Leader, March 2013, Vol. 18, 32. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ5.18032013.32
The ASHA Leader, March 2013, Vol. 18, 32. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ5.18032013.32
Compared with paper-and-pencil tests, a virtual reality test developed at the University of Toronto Scarborough may better predict whether a cognitive impairment will have real-world consequences, according to a study in the June 2012 issue of Applied Neuropsychology Adult.
The Multitasking in the City Task asks participants to navigate their way through a computer-game-like virtual world in which they perform tasks such as delivering packages or running errands. Researchers administered a battery of standard tests as well as the virtual reality test to 13 people who had suffered stroke or traumatic brain injury. Participants also completed a questionnaire on how severely their cognitive deficits affected their daily lives. The standard tests didn't predict how big an impact the participants' cognitive deficits had on their daily lives as accurately as the virtual test.
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March 2013
Volume 18, Issue 3