From the Journals: Early Intervention for Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis Preserves Hearing Early recognition and treatment for granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener's granulomatosis) can reverse hearing loss and reduce the possibility of disease progression, complications and the need for aggressive treatment, according to a study published in the December 2012 issue of the American Journal of Audiology. The study contrasts ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   March 01, 2013
From the Journals: Early Intervention for Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis Preserves Hearing
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Hearing & Speech Perception / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   March 01, 2013
From the Journals: Early Intervention for Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis Preserves Hearing
The ASHA Leader, March 2013, Vol. 18, 32. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ4.18032013.32
The ASHA Leader, March 2013, Vol. 18, 32. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ4.18032013.32
Early recognition and treatment for granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener's granulomatosis) can reverse hearing loss and reduce the possibility of disease progression, complications and the need for aggressive treatment, according to a study published in the December 2012 issue of the American Journal of Audiology. The study contrasts the reversal of hearing loss and prevention of disease progression with early recognition and treatment.
A rare disorder, granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a systemic, necrotizing granulomatous vasculitis that can affect, in particular, the lungs, sinuses and kidneys. The authors report two contrasting cases with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, which were positive for granulomatosis with polyangiitis, but presented initially in the form of both conductive and sensorineural hearing loss without systemic features.
Researchers measured changes in hearing using a GSI 61 audiometer, as well as guidelines from the British Society of Audiology, and detected serum antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence and formalin fixed neutrophils. They also measured proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase antibodies using a fluoroenzyme immunoassay.
The study's results suggest that deafness and systemic disease are more likely, and more aggressive therapy is required, when the diagnosis of granulomatosis with polyangiitis is delayed. Even in the absence of systemic symptoms, clinicians should consider granulomatosis with polyangiitis in cases of acute or subacute deafness presenting over days to weeks.
Negative or weak antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies should not exclude the possible diagnosis of granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and clinicians should maintain a high degree of suspicion.
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March 2013
Volume 18, Issue 3