From the Journals: Word Lists Aid Writing for Children With Complex Communication Needs Word lists are helpful to inform vocabulary selection, organization and instruction for students who are beginning writers and have complex communication needs, according to a study published in the January 2013 issue of Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. The study extends previous research by examining the vocabulary used ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   March 01, 2013
From the Journals: Word Lists Aid Writing for Children With Complex Communication Needs
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Development / Hearing & Speech Perception / School-Based Settings / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   March 01, 2013
From the Journals: Word Lists Aid Writing for Children With Complex Communication Needs
The ASHA Leader, March 2013, Vol. 18, 31. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ3.18032013.31
The ASHA Leader, March 2013, Vol. 18, 31. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ3.18032013.31
Word lists are helpful to inform vocabulary selection, organization and instruction for students who are beginning writers and have complex communication needs, according to a study published in the January 2013 issue of Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools. The study extends previous research by examining the vocabulary used in different genres, and underlines the importance of providing access to genre-appropriate vocabulary choices to students with complex communication needs.
Researchers examined the vocabulary words and multiword sequences used by 124 typically developing kindergarten and first-grade students when they wrote about self-selected topics. Using the Child Language Analysis software program, they analyzed a total of 457 writing samples, classified according to nine genres: label, story, narrative recount, plan, procedure, description, report, opinion or explanation.
The authors found that 140 words represented 70 percent of the vocabulary produced. The most common genre types were narrative recounts and opinions, and the patterns of frequency for words and multiword sequences varied across genres. The degree of variation was greater for particular vocabulary words. For instance, the word "going" was used predominantly in one genre. In contrast, the word "mom" was used in every genre except three. Students tended to use structure words (e.g., determiners, pronouns, auxiliaries) with high frequency across genres.
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March 2013
Volume 18, Issue 3