From the Journals: Relative Frequency Predicts Presence of Voice Disorders Relative fundamental frequency—that is, voice frequency immediately before and after production of voiceless consonants—more accurately indicates the presence of a voice disorder than does voice quality severity or vocal effort, according to a study published in the December 2012 issue of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. The ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   March 01, 2013
From the Journals: Relative Frequency Predicts Presence of Voice Disorders
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Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   March 01, 2013
From the Journals: Relative Frequency Predicts Presence of Voice Disorders
The ASHA Leader, March 2013, Vol. 18, 31. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ1.18032013.31
The ASHA Leader, March 2013, Vol. 18, 31. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ1.18032013.31
Relative fundamental frequency—that is, voice frequency immediately before and after production of voiceless consonants—more accurately indicates the presence of a voice disorder than does voice quality severity or vocal effort, according to a study published in the December 2012 issue of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research.
The authors aimed to determine the relationship between relative fundamental frequency and listeners' perception of vocal effort in people with varying degrees of vocal hyperfunction. Thirty women diagnosed with voice disorders commonly associated with vocal hyperfunction and 10 healthy women provided speech samples that were used to obtain parameters of relative fundamental frequency. Twelve listeners judged the speech samples for overall severity and vocal effort using rating scales.
Researchers found significant but relatively weak negative correlations between perceptual measures and offset relative fundamental frequency parameters. Although offset relative fundamental frequency was increased in healthy participants relative to speakers with voice disorders, listeners perceived no differences in relative fundamental frequency as a function of severity of vocal effort in people with voice disorders.
Researchers noted a statistically significant correlation between offset relative fundamental frequency and vocal effort, but examination of the data as a function of both vocal effort and health status indicated that relative fundamental frequency more accurately predicts a voice disorder. Further research is needed to investigate the clinical utility of relative fundamental frequency measures for assessment of rehabilitation progress.
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March 2013
Volume 18, Issue 3