Blogjam: Pay Attention to Your Taxes In a post cautioning audiologists not to hand off their private-practice taxes totally to their accountants, no questions asked, audiology business coach Richard Poage spells out how an accountant's interest in those taxes may differ from your own. "It is important to realize even a relatively large audiology practice will ... Blogjam
Blogjam  |   March 01, 2013
Blogjam: Pay Attention to Your Taxes
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Blogjam
Blogjam   |   March 01, 2013
Blogjam: Pay Attention to Your Taxes
The ASHA Leader, March 2013, Vol. 18, 9. doi:10.1044/leader.BGJ3.18032013.9
The ASHA Leader, March 2013, Vol. 18, 9. doi:10.1044/leader.BGJ3.18032013.9
In a post cautioning audiologists not to hand off their private-practice taxes totally to their accountants, no questions asked, audiology business coach Richard Poage spells out how an accountant's interest in those taxes may differ from your own.
"It is important to realize even a relatively large audiology practice will always be a relatively small part of any accountant's tax business. In most cases today, your return is prepared by someone in your accountant's office electronically uploading your data—a QuickBooks file, probably—into a program and clicking on ‘prepare.' Often there is no complete review, just clearing up an exception report of things that ‘look funny,' which is typically performed by a staff bookkeeper.
"Like in your practice, the patient who comes in every two years for an evaluation and pays you for it is a valuable customer, but not one that you really have the time to know everything about their health care situation."
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March 2013
Volume 18, Issue 3