Inbox: Fighting Fraud Thank you for the Nov. 20 article on fraud and ethical dilemmas. Ethical dilemmas occur daily in large rehabilitation companies—an experience common among SLPs I know—because facilities get paid according to the patient's rehab category, which is based on how many therapy minutes the patient receives. The companies I worked ... Inbox
Inbox  |   February 01, 2013
Inbox: Fighting Fraud
Author Notes
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / ASHA News & Member Stories / Inbox
Inbox   |   February 01, 2013
Inbox: Fighting Fraud
The ASHA Leader, February 2013, Vol. 18, 3-4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.18022013.3
The ASHA Leader, February 2013, Vol. 18, 3-4. doi:10.1044/leader.IN4.18022013.3
Thank you for the Nov. 20 article on fraud and ethical dilemmas. Ethical dilemmas occur daily in large rehabilitation companies—an experience common among SLPs I know—because facilities get paid according to the patient's rehab category, which is based on how many therapy minutes the patient receives.
The companies I worked for stated they tolerated no fraud. However, I was consistently assigned to treat patients 55 minutes daily, even before I had evaluated them. When I questioned the patient's need for any treatment—never mind 55 minutes—I was told, "You need to justify your position" or "Every patient has the right to therapy to help them achieve their maximum potential." Pressure was particularly strong for Medicare B patients.
A manager once wrote me up for coming in three minutes under. I left that job when a new manager stated, "I'm all about the numbers."
I complained that my professional judgments were overruled by someone not trained in speech-language pathology and that I was pressured to see patients who did not need treatment. I referred them to ASHA's Board of Ethics. It made no difference.
ASHA should pressure companies to modify their culture by inviting SLPs to report such situations and notifying companies about the complaints and referring them for investigation. Without strong support, clinicians can do little and risk losing their jobs.
I hope ASHA sees this as an opportunity to develop its presence as a professional organization that insists its members be treated with respect and valued for their knowledge and expertise.
Diana von Hallett
Brunswick, Maine
0 Comments
Submit a Comment
Submit A Comment
Name
Comment Title
Comment


This feature is available to Subscribers Only
Sign In or Create an Account ×
FROM THIS ISSUE
February 2013
Volume 18, Issue 2