From the Journals: Accuracy of Lexical Stress Critical to Reading Success Morphophonology—accurately produced lexical stress in derived words—involving suprasegmental factors (for example, tone, stress, prosody) may be an area of similarity among different languages or dialects and has a consistent relationship to word reading. Stress accuracy was consistently related to reading measures, even when phonological and morphological awareness were not, according ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   February 01, 2013
From the Journals: Accuracy of Lexical Stress Critical to Reading Success
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Development / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   February 01, 2013
From the Journals: Accuracy of Lexical Stress Critical to Reading Success
The ASHA Leader, February 2013, Vol. 18, 35. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ7.18022013.35
The ASHA Leader, February 2013, Vol. 18, 35. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ7.18022013.35
Morphophonology—accurately produced lexical stress in derived words—involving suprasegmental factors (for example, tone, stress, prosody) may be an area of similarity among different languages or dialects and has a consistent relationship to word reading. Stress accuracy was consistently related to reading measures, even when phonological and morphological awareness were not, according to a study in the October 2012 issue of Language, Speech,and Hearing Services in Schools.
The authors examined the influence of demographic variables on nonmainstream American English use; the differences between nonmainstream American English speakers and mainstream American English speakers on measures of metalinguistics, single-word reading and a new measure of morphophonology; and the differences between the two groups in the relationships among the measures.
Participants were 42 typically developing third-graders from Memphis, Tenn., half who spoke mainstream American English and half who spoke nonmainstream American English. The children received a battery of tests measuring phonological and morphological awareness, morphophonology, decoding, and word identification.
Controlling for socioeconomic status, results indicated that measures of phonological awareness, decoding and word identification were higher for mainstream American English than for nonmainstream American English speakers. There was no difference in stress accuracy between the dialect groups.
Only for the nonmainstream American English group was phonological and morphological awareness significantly related to decoding and word identification. Stress accuracy was correlated with word reading for the nonmainstream American English speakers and with all measures for the mainstream American English speakers.
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February 2013
Volume 18, Issue 2