From the Journals: Age and Treatment Intensity Prove Key in Autism A child's age and intensity of treatment—but not the type of treatment or who delivered it—were associated with better behavioral outcomes for toddlers at risk for autism spectrum disorders, according to a study in the October 2012 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   February 01, 2013
From the Journals: Age and Treatment Intensity Prove Key in Autism
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Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   February 01, 2013
From the Journals: Age and Treatment Intensity Prove Key in Autism
The ASHA Leader, February 2013, Vol. 18, 34. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ4.18022013.34
The ASHA Leader, February 2013, Vol. 18, 34. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ4.18022013.34
A child's age and intensity of treatment—but not the type of treatment or who delivered it—were associated with better behavioral outcomes for toddlers at risk for autism spectrum disorders, according to a study in the October 2012 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
Researchers studied 98 families of children, ages 14 to 24 months, who were at risk for autism spectrum disorders. They sought to determine the efficacy of a 12-week, low-intensity, parent-delivered intervention. In this three-site, randomized controlled trial, some children received usual community treatment, and others participated in the Early Start Denver Model.
In this model, parents receive instruction on using a child-centered responsive interaction style that embeds many teaching opportunities into play. Assessments were completed at baseline and 12 weeks later, immediately after the end of parent coaching sessions.
Group assignment had no effect on parent-child interaction or on any child outcomes. Both groups of parents improved interaction skills, and both groups of children demonstrated progress. Children in the community group received significantly more intervention hours than those in the parent-implemented intervention group.
Study evidence—that both younger age and more intervention hours positively affect developmental rates—holds implications for clinical practice, service delivery and public policy.
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February 2013
Volume 18, Issue 2