From the Journals: Preschoolers Understand Human Speech Better Than Synthesized Speech Although preschool children understand synthesized speech in typical listening environments, and can improve their listening accuracy with repeated exposures, their understanding doesn't reach the same level of accuracy as with human-recorded speech, according to a study in the November 2012 American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. The study examined the ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   February 01, 2013
From the Journals: Preschoolers Understand Human Speech Better Than Synthesized Speech
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Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Speech, Voice & Prosody / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   February 01, 2013
From the Journals: Preschoolers Understand Human Speech Better Than Synthesized Speech
The ASHA Leader, February 2013, Vol. 18, 33. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ2.18022013.33
The ASHA Leader, February 2013, Vol. 18, 33. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ2.18022013.33
Although preschool children understand synthesized speech in typical listening environments, and can improve their listening accuracy with repeated exposures, their understanding doesn't reach the same level of accuracy as with human-recorded speech, according to a study in the November 2012 American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology.
The study examined the effect of repeated exposure to novel and repeated spoken words in typical environments on the intelligibility of two synthesized voices and human-recorded speech. Eighteen preschoolers listened to and repeated single words presented in human-recorded speech and in DECtalk Paul and AT&T Voice Michael—two varieties of speech-synthesizing software—during five experimental sessions in the presence of noise typical of classroom or home settings.
There was a significant main effect for voice. Participants were more accurate in identifying words in the human-recorded speech and AT&T Voice than in the DECtalk speech output condition. When averaged across speech output conditions, children increased their accuracy as they participated in additional sessions. There was a statistically significant interaction between session and voice. DECtalk had a slightly larger effect of session than did AT&T Voice and human-recorded speech.
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February 2013
Volume 18, Issue 2