From the Journals: More Education Improves Failed Hearing Screening Follow-Up Underserved communities may need extra support to navigate the steps that follow failed newborn hearing screenings, according to a study in the December 2012 issue of the American Journal of Audiology. With delayed identification of permanent childhood hearing loss a major public health concern, the authors suggest continuing public awareness ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   February 01, 2013
From the Journals: More Education Improves Failed Hearing Screening Follow-Up
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Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   February 01, 2013
From the Journals: More Education Improves Failed Hearing Screening Follow-Up
The ASHA Leader, February 2013, Vol. 18, 33. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ1.18022013.33
The ASHA Leader, February 2013, Vol. 18, 33. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ1.18022013.33
Underserved communities may need extra support to navigate the steps that follow failed newborn hearing screenings, according to a study in the December 2012 issue of the American Journal of Audiology. With delayed identification of permanent childhood hearing loss a major public health concern, the authors suggest continuing public awareness campaigns and education of providers and families about hearing loss.
Study researchers sought to document the epidemiological characteristics of a group of children who are hard of hearing, identify individual predictor variables for timely follow-up after a failed newborn hearing screening, and identify barriers to follow-up that families encounter.
The authors used an accelerated longitudinal design to investigate outcomes for children who are hard of hearing in a large, multicenter study. The AJA-published study involved a subgroup of 193 children with hearing loss who did not pass the newborn hearing screening. Researchers used available records to document the ages of children when they were confirmed to have hearing loss, received hearing aid fittings and entered into early intervention. They used linear regression models to investigate relationships among individual predictor variables and age at each follow-up benchmark.
Of several predictor variables, only higher levels of maternal education were significantly associated with earlier confirmation of hearing loss and fitting of hearing aids. The severity of the hearing loss was not. No variables were significantly associated with age of entry into early intervention. A majority of children met each recommended benchmark, but only one-third met all the benchmarks within the recommended time frame.
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February 2013
Volume 18, Issue 2