From the Journals: Cardiorespiratory Health May Predict Better Hearing Physical fitness is a strong predictor of various health outcomes, and improved hearing may soon be added to that list. Researchers have found a correlation between cardiorespiratory fitness and hearing sensitivity, according to a study in ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   January 01, 2013
From the Journals: Cardiorespiratory Health May Predict Better Hearing
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Hearing & Speech Perception / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   January 01, 2013
From the Journals: Cardiorespiratory Health May Predict Better Hearing
The ASHA Leader, January 2013, Vol. 18, 32. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ4.18012013.32
The ASHA Leader, January 2013, Vol. 18, 32. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ4.18012013.32
Physical fitness is a strong predictor of various health outcomes, and improved hearing may soon be added to that list. Researchers have found a correlation between cardiorespiratory fitness and hearing sensitivity, according to a study in the June 2012 American Journal of Audiology, but further research is needed to confirm the findings.
Following up on previous, smaller-scale studies, researchers examined data from the 1999–2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Their final sample included 1,082 survey participants ages 20–49 years, a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. Researchers used an established nonexercise prediction equation, and extrapolation of heart-rates during treadmill tests, to obtain participants' maximum oxygen uptake. They then compared this information with audiometric data showing participants' low and high pure-tone frequency averages.
Maximum oxygen uptake was not associated with hearing when the heart-rate extrapolation method was used. However, with the nonexercise prediction equation, oxygen uptake correlated with greater hearing sensitivity for women. Women with higher predicted cardiorespiratory fitness were six percent more likely than less-fit women to have good hearing as opposed to worse hearing. Although these findings suggest a potentially auditory-protective effect of physical fitness, researchers caution that further confirmatory studies are needed.
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January 2013
Volume 18, Issue 1