From the Journals: Sound Booth Proves Best for Remote Speech Perception The listening environment, rather than the software used, has more of an effect on speech perception for people with cochlear implants who receive telehealth audiologic services, according to a study in the October 2012 issue of ... From the Journals
From the Journals  |   January 01, 2013
From the Journals: Sound Booth Proves Best for Remote Speech Perception
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Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / From the Journals
From the Journals   |   January 01, 2013
From the Journals: Sound Booth Proves Best for Remote Speech Perception
The ASHA Leader, January 2013, Vol. 18, 31. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ2.18012013.31
The ASHA Leader, January 2013, Vol. 18, 31. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ2.18012013.31
The listening environment, rather than the software used, has more of an effect on speech perception for people with cochlear implants who receive telehealth audiologic services, according to a study in the October 2012 issue of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. The results suggest that regardless of the remote system used, speech perception is best when evaluated in a sound-treated booth.
Researchers evaluated the effects of remote systems and acoustic environment on speech perception via telehealth for 16 adults and children who use cochlear implants. They measured speech perception in quiet and in noise, using the Polycom visual concert (a system designed to transmit high-resolution graphics and audio remotely) and a hybrid presentation system (custom software designed to eliminate bandwidth and compression issues).
For speech in quiet, the environment played a strong role, with better performance in a sound-treated booth than in a nearby Cochlear Implant Research Laboratory office; the system used had no effect. Speech in noise revealed interactions between environment and system: participants performed more poorly on Polycom visual concert in the office, but performance in a sound-treated booth was no different. The hybrid presentation system was superior for listening to speech-in-noise in a reverberant environment. The authors suggest that future research be geared toward modifications to non-sound-treated environments to improve telehealth service delivery in rural areas.
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January 2013
Volume 18, Issue 1