SLPs Report Stable Productivity Levels, More Ethical Challenges Where Do Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists Work Most audiologists work in health care facilities, and more than half of speech-language pathologists work in schools, according to survey data from 2013. Audiologists’ Work Settings At the end of 2013, nearly three-quarters of audiologists (73.5 percent) worked in health care settings, including ... At a Glance
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At a Glance  |   June 01, 2014
SLPs Report Stable Productivity Levels, More Ethical Challenges
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Professional Issues & Training / At a Glance
At a Glance   |   June 01, 2014
SLPs Report Stable Productivity Levels, More Ethical Challenges
The ASHA Leader, June 2014, Vol. 19, 24. doi:10.1044/leader.AAG.19062014.24
The ASHA Leader, June 2014, Vol. 19, 24. doi:10.1044/leader.AAG.19062014.24
Where Do Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists Work Most audiologists work in health care facilities, and more than half of speech-language pathologists work in schools, according to survey data from 2013. Audiologists’ Work Settings At the end of 2013, nearly three-quarters of audiologists (73.5 percent) worked in health care settings, including 47.3 percent in nonresidential health care facilities—such as private physicians’ or audiologists’ offices—25.1 percent in hospitals, and 1.1 percent in residential health care facilities such as skilled nursing facilities. About 15.6 percent were employed in educational settings, including 8.4 percent in schools and 7.2 percent in colleges and universities. More than one quarter (28.6 percent) were employed full- or part-time in private practice, a slight increase over the past few years. SLPs’ Work Settings More than half of SLPs (55.9 percent) were employed in educational settings, including 53 percent in schools and 2.9 percent in colleges and universities. An additional 38.8 percent were employed in health care settings, including 15.8 percent in nonresidential health care facilities, 12.6 percent in hospitals, and 10.4 percent in residential health care facilities. Nearly one-fifth (18.8 percent) were employed full- or part-time in private practice, a rate somewhat higher than the past few years’ rates.n = 11,175 Source: ASHA Summary Membership and Affiliation Counts for Year-End 2013
Productivity levels have remained stable among speech-language pathologists in recent years, but ethical pressures have increased, according to ASHA’s 2013 Speech-Language Pathology Health Care Survey results.
Productivity levels
In 2013, full-time SLPs working in health care settings reported spending 73 percent of their time in direct treatment (individual and group), about the same as in 2011 (75 percent).
n = 1,068
The percentage of clinicians’ time spent in direct treatment—individual and group—varies by health care setting. In 2013, percentages ranged from 68 percent in pediatric hospitals to 77 percent in skilled nursing facilities.
Source. ASHA 2013 SLP Health Care Survey
Ethical challenges
In the 2013 survey, SLPs in health care settings were asked if they had felt pressured by employers or supervisors to engage in clinically inappropriate activities in the past 12 months. Overall, 71 percent said they had not, compared with 74 percent in 2009. Of those who had, 14 percent indicated they had felt pressured to “provide inappropriate frequency or intensity of services,” up from 10 percent in 2009.
Percentages for “provide inappropriate frequency or intensity of services” vary by health care setting. In 2013, they ranged from 5 percent in outpatient clinics and offices to 33 percent in skilled nursing facilities (up from 27 percent in 2009).
Source. ASHA 2013 SLP Health Care Survey
Activity
  • Bill inappropriate codes 3%

  • Provide a specific type of treatment 5%

  • Provide inappropriate frequency or intensity of services 14%

  • Provide services for which you had inadequate training and/or experience 5%

  • Provide services that are not clinically appropriate 8%

  • Other activity 3%

  • Did not feel pressured 71%

n = 2,047
See additional survey data for SLPs in health care settings.
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June 2014
Volume 19, Issue 6