Blogjam Sometimes it’s difficult to translate speech-language treatment into a Marzano framework—a system used to rank children’s progress toward their educational goals. At the Crazy Speech World blog, Jenn provides a free chart that can help school-based speech-language pathologists fit what they do into the Marzano box. “I created this ... Blogjam
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Blogjam  |   August 01, 2014
Blogjam
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Blogjam
Blogjam   |   August 01, 2014
Blogjam
The ASHA Leader, August 2014, Vol. 19, 22. doi:10.1044/leader.BGJ.19082014.22
The ASHA Leader, August 2014, Vol. 19, 22. doi:10.1044/leader.BGJ.19082014.22
Translate Treatment Into Goals
Sometimes it’s difficult to translate speech-language treatment into a Marzano framework—a system used to rank children’s progress toward their educational goals. At the Crazy Speech World blog, Jenn provides a free chart that can help school-based speech-language pathologists fit what they do into the Marzano box.
“I created this four-point scale to cover me for all of my students who are working on articulation skills,” Jenn writes. “It is an easy tool ... in fact, I can use it across my caseload! This gives me some good (and interesting) feedback about where my students feel they are working. I included a full page, plus two half-pages that you can use with your students as well! I use the full page on my board, then the half-pages for the student to have.”
The ‘Stretch’ of Flexibility
Maureen Wilson of The Speech Bubble notes that some of her students have difficulty with the notion of their brain’s “flexibility” and “flexible” thinking. She realized she needed to think outside the box to help them understand the concept.
“With the help of tissue paper, plastic wrap, a Sharpie, and some classroom objects I managed to create a demonstration,” she writes. “I drew brains on the tissue paper and on the plastic wrap … I had two students hold the plastic wrap tight and began to place items on it (a bottle of glue, book, tape, etc.). As the items were added the plastic wrap stretched. I explained that the items were information and when we are thinking flexibly our brains ‘stretch’ to take it all in. Next they held the tissue paper and we repeated the same process … When more and more ‘information’ was added, the tissue paper broke. I explained when we only allow ourselves to think about parts of a situation, it can be hard for our brains to process it and we can have a breakdown in communication.”
He Said, She Said
Teaching personal pronouns to preschoolers can be challenging, for sure, so SLP blogger Sherry Artemenko offers a game to get the young set on the road to gender identification. The trick is to focus on one pronoun first before introducing the other. Case in point: Artemenko sits with a client playing with a Fisher-Price Happy Family Set, using only girl figurines. Artemenko makes a point of using the pronoun “she” to describe the figurines as often as possible. Eventually the child catches on and then Artemenko introduces “he.”
“Putting it front and forward helps [the client] be more attentive to using it,” Artemenko writes. “I actually heard one or two spontaneous uses of ‘she’ during that first session.”
Help Them Get a Handle on Time
Many students with speech-language impairments also have trouble with executive function and time management. SLP blogger Jill Kuzma has developed a PowerPoint presentation to help middle and high school students manage their minutes at home and school. There are 10 slides: The first five show students what time-management looks like at school and home; the second five are meant to be printed in a full-page format, stapled together and presented to the students as a tool to take notes on during the initial slides.
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FROM THIS ISSUE
August 2014
Volume 19, Issue 8